“Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer,” explained Bruce Hollis, the study’s lead researcher and a professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. For the study, researchers randomly assigned 37 men who elected to have their prostate removed to receive either 4,000 international units of vitamin D or an inactive placebo daily for 60 days before their operation.

Click here to read original article